Accessibility View Close toolbar

Your Inner Ecology

In April 2010 the BP Deep Horizon drilling rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in a catastrophic offshore oil spill. Millions of barrels of oil have spilled into the Gulf since the explosion, representing an unprecedented environmental disaster. Many complex ecosystems are affected by the oil spill, ranging from the Louisiana bayous and associated wetlands to as-yet-unexplored deep ocean ecologies.

The Deep Horizon explosion has focused public attention on ocean, gulf, and wetlands ecologies. The grave threats posed to these environmental ecosystems can also focus attention on our own internal ecosystems.

We tend not to think of our human physiology in terms of ecosystems. But in fact the analogy is a close one. For example, water comprises approximately 70% of the earth's surface. The amount of water in the adult human body is estimated at between 60 and 70%. This is a startlingly similar correspondence. Water is the basis for human physiology, as it is the basis for the existence of life on earth. Our physiologic water is subject to the same ecologic stresses as is the water in our external environment.

Human blood is composed of approximately 90% water by volume. Your body attempts to control certain characteristics of blood very closely. For example, the acid-base balance of blood is maintained within a very tight range - a pH between 7.35 and 7.45. Blood levels of calcium are also tightly controlled, within a range of 8.5 to 10.5 milligrams for every 100 milliliters of blood. Lower calcium levels will cause calcium to be leeched out of bone to restore blood levels to within the normal range.

Just as oil has been washing up on the shores of the Louisiana coastline for many months during 2010, your body's internal coastlines can be similarly breached. Prolonged elevated blood levels of cholesterol, for example, will cause cholesterol to "wash up" on the surfaces of cells lining the walls of small blood vessels. These endothelial cells normally constitute an effective barrier, protecting the structures of arterioles and capillaries. But these cardiovascular coastlines can be damaged by cholesterol "spills", resulting in formation of arteriosclerotic plaque and narrowing of small blood vessels.1

Similarly, high levels of blood glucose (as in diabetes) can cause these simple sugars to wash up on the shores of small blood vessels in the kidney, retina, and nerves. Serious damage to kidneys, the eyes, and nerves can result.2,3

Failure to take appropriate precautions and heed warning signs is the likely cause of the Deep Horizon explosion. In order for us to ongoingly maintain a healthy inner ecology, we need to do what was not done in this oil-drilling operation. Making proactive lifestyle choices is a key to creating and supporting an inner ecology that will reward us with long-term health and well-being.

Engaging in regular chiropractic care is a one such lifestyle choice that helps support a healthy inner ecology.

1Gooding HC, de Ferranti SD: Cardiovascular risk assessment and cholesterol management in adolescents: getting to the heart of the matter. Curr Opini Pediatr May 17 2010 (ahead of print)
2Shogbon AO, Levy SB: Intensive glucose control in the management of diabetes mellitus and inpatient hyperglycemia. Am J Health Syst Pharm 67(10):798-805, 2010
3Stolar MW, et al: Managing type 2 diabetes: going beyond glycemic control. J Manag Care Pharm 14(5 Suppl B):S2-S19, 2008

New patients receive a free consultation!

Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

7:30am - 12pm and 3pm - 6pm

Tuesday:

3pm - 6pm

Wednesday:

7:30am - 12pm and 3pm - 6pm

Thursday:

7:30am - 12pm and 3pm - 6pm

Friday:

Closed

Saturday:

Appointment Only

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

  • "Dr. Blair and his staff are wonderful, caring individuals who have always given my family the best care. You guys are amazing!"
  • Dynamic Warm-ups

    In a common occurrence, you bend over to pick up the pencil you inadvertently dropped on the floor. Or you bend over to pick up the soap bar that has slipped through your fingers in the shower. Or you bend over to lift a bag of groceries out of your automobile trunk. These are all daily events. But on ...

    Read More
  • Smart Shoulders

    Our shoulder joints have the greatest range of motion of any of the musculoskeletal joints in our bodies. The shoulder joint is really two joints, the glenohumeral joint between the arm bone (humerus) and the shoulder blade (scapula) and the acromioclavicular joint between the acromion (a bony projection off the scapula) and the collarbone (clavicle). The glenohumeral joint is a ball-and-socket joint and the acromioclavicular joint is a gliding joint. ...

    Read More
  • A Book and Its Cover

    A book cover may not necessarily tell the whole story and may not accurately portray the nature of the contents within. Publishing companies pay high salaries to their marketing staff to create cover copy that will entice prospective buyers to make a purchase. But many times the book itself does not ...

    Read More
  • When Your Spine Is In Line

    Good spinal alignment means good biomechanical health. Essentially, your spine is the biomechanical center of your body. Your legs are connected to your spine via two large and strong pelvic bones. Your arms are connected to your spine via your shoulder blades, ribs, and numerous strong muscles and ligaments. ...

    Read More
  • An Apple a Day . . .

    What is so good about an apple? Is it the color, ranging from ruby red to pale pink? Is it the crunch? The sweetness? Or is it, instead, a combination of all of these qualities, plus the natural goodness derived from the apple's secret ingredients — phytonutrients? If this were a multiple choice quiz, the answer would be "all of the above". Importantly, in addition to possessing numerous appealing physical qualities, apples contain an abundance of health-promoting biochemicals known as phytonutrients.1,2 These specific organic molecules are derived not only from apples but many other fresh fruits and vegetables, and help power the immune system, protect against cancer, maintain healthy eyes, and assist cells in clearing out metabolic waste products such as free radicals. ...

    Read More
  • Standing Tall

    Young peoples' bones stop growing by approximately age 20, somewhat earlier in women and somewhat later in men. Long bone growth, that is, in the arm, forearm, thigh, and leg, ceases later and smaller bone growth, that is, in the hands, feet, and spine, ceases earlier. In essence, you're as tall as you're ...

    Read More
  • Spring Forth!

    Spring is arriving. The days are getting longer, the air is fresher, and the sunlight is brighter. Flowers and bushes are beginning to bloom. Tree sap is running and there are new baby animals in the world. In short, the world is being renewed and, if we choose to, we too can actively participate in ...

    Read More
  • Chiropractic Care for the Young and the Young at Heart

    Children and adults are the same but different. Most kids want to play all the time, but they also are required to go to school. Most adults would prefer to play all the time – relax, go to the gym, read a book, watch TV, or get together with friends – but most adults need to go to work at least ...

    Read More
  • Care of Concussions

    Concussions are becoming increasingly common, especially among school-age athletes. It has been estimated that there are up to 3.8 million sports-related concussions in the United States each year. Concussions are problematic as, by definition, a concussive injury involves some degree of trauma to the ...

    Read More
  • Ice Capades

    In the depths of winter, adults, as well as children, exert themselves to engage in enjoyable outdoor activities that will keep them warm and provide both excitement and entertainment. Cross-country skiing, downhill skiing, sledding, ice hockey, figure skating, and speed skating all have their enthusiasts. Many ...

    Read More

Newsletter Signup